about_faces (about_faces) wrote,
about_faces
about_faces

New Comics Review: Brain Surgery Fun Time with Harvey Dent in LotDK #15 (2012), "Together"

Note: LJ has introduced some new updating software that seems to be screwing everything up, cutting off whole chunks of text and doubling up others for no reason. My apologies if there are errors in this review. I will strive to fix them, but if I cannot, then I will just delete this entry until LJ gets their shit together. Unless they won't let me delete it. In which case, I'm screwed. Yay!





So! A flawed but fascinating new Two-Face story has just come out in the online pages of DC's digital relaunch of the venerable Batman title Legends of the Dark Knight.

Has anyone been reading the new LotDK? I've been curious to check it out, as that's a title which is very close to my heart. I was intrigued by the fatally-flawed-but-well-written first issue written by Damon Lindelof of Lost and Prometheus fame/infamy, and I was curious to read the other stories. I had hoped it would yield a neat mixed bag of interesting stories by different creative voices ala the original LotDK and Batman: Black and White, but I also feared that it'd just end up being a dumping ground for misfit stories, ala titles such as the late and unlamented Batman Confidential and, well, what LotDK itself eventually became.



As such, I've held off on reading the new LotDK, which I understand has been pretty much nothing but Joker story after Joker story. I also heard about a three-parter with Slam Bradley versus Black Mask, and as I loved Slam from Brubaker and Cooke's Catwoman, I'd like to read that at some point. Of course, when I learned that issue #15 featured a standalone Two-Face story, which you can all buy and read right now for just 99¢! Obviously, I had to make an exception and splurge, even though I had no idea what to expect.

The writer, Jonathan Larsen, is apparently a relative comics newbie who mainly has experience producing shows like Countdown and The Daily Show, as well as his current gig producing MSNBC's Up with Chris Hayes. That's an impressive resume, but it didn't tell me a dang thing about what a Batman comic by him would be like. The art, meanwhile, is by Tan Eng Huat, whose work I loved in John Arcudi's little-read Doom Patrol run before it evolved into a more grotesque style in stuff like Andrew Helfer's (!) Batman: Journey Into Knight, a maxi-series which I really wanted to love more than I did.

Now, having read their Two-Face story in LotDK, I can't help wonder if I was too distracted by the artwork to enjoy the story, because I fear that it got into the way of my enjoyment of this one too. Not that the story itself is perfect either, but all the same, this is a surprising little story that actually treats Harvey with more respect than he's gotten in years, and it's one of the most interesting attempts to tackle Two-Face that I've read recently.

Note: I go really in-depth with this one, so you might just want to buy the issue for 99¢ and read it first, then join me to pick it apart. But I'll do my best to keep you up to speed about the plot along the way.





The issue spends its first few pages to setting up the crime and having Batman investigate in his own Bat-manner. This familiar set-up is handled quite well by Larsen, who even manages to make it a touch personal for Bruce with just one simple line. Unfortunately, these pages will eventually take up time that might be better spent on character stuff in the second half, but this is a Batman story, so we have to have a certain amount of set-up and detective work. Thankfully, while this routine is often handled tediously, Larsen takes us through the beats in a swift and compact fashion.

The gist is this: two children have been kidnapped, both of whom are epileptics who recently underwent radical neurosurgery. This doesn't sit well with Batman, who sees it less as two families who lost their children, but rather children who lost their families. Nice touch, that. Batman is ready to put the surgeon at the top of his suspects list until he discovers that the doctor himself has also been kidnapped!

Reading through the surgeon's files, Batman deduces that the surgeon was the real target all along, while the two kids were mainly kidnapped to study the procedure's effects. And when Batman reads what the procedure actually entails, he realizes that only one person could have done this, and that "the motive is too horrible to imagine." Rushing to the surgeon's private clinic in the middle of the night, Batman takes out the henchman (the single henchman, something which, for him, "should be unthinkable") standing guard.

As he races towards the OR, Batman thinks, "This time there's no coming back. If he gets away with it. Don't do it. Please. Don't let him do this to you." And he bursts in, calling Harvey's name.





In case it's not clear from the narrative (and I didn't find this clear at all the first time I read it), but Batman assumes that Harvey's ultimate goal is to pull a Batman: Jekyll & Hyde on himself, completely locking his good side inside his own head and thus giving the monster Two-Face full control forever. Yeah, I'm no neurosurgeon, but I get the distinct feeling that this plan wouldn't work even a little bit, especially since this story makes the same B:J&H mistake of of thinking that Harvey's "good" and "evil" sides are actually LOCATED in the left and right hemispheres of his brain. Well, LotDK is out of continuity, so let's accept that Harvey's brain works that way in this universe.

Also, since it seems that patients undergoing corpus callostomies are put to sleep through sedation during the procedure, the fact that Harvey's awake the whole time is a nice throwback to the great story where Harvey stayed awake through his own plastic surgery, keeping a gun on Dr. Ekhart the whole time to ensure no funny business.

But unlike Ekhart, this unnamed neurosurgeon is more of a risk-taker, and when Harvey orders his men to shoot Batman, the neurosurgeon quickly jabs a syringe into Harvey's exposed brain! Gyahhh! I know the brain has no feeling, but even still...! Batman quickly subdues the other henchman, whose stray gunfire blows up some medical equipment, starting a fire which threatens to burn down the clinic. Well done, Bruce! But at least now he can focus on Harvey... whatever's left of him.




Oh man, so many mixed feelings about this.

First off, remember, we're accepting the premise that Harvey's mental illness works this way for this story's continuity, because it sure as hell doesn't for Harvey anywhere else, much less in real life. If the "bad side" could be so specifically located and locked out, then theoretically, he'd just need to regularly numb that side of his brain (or, say, undergo one-time brain surgery, *meaningful look*) and he'd at least be able to keep Two-Face at bay. Keep that in mind (hurr) for when we get to the end.

So okay, the bad half of Harvey's brain is numb and he's finally free, but he cannot actually speak. I'm assuming that this moment is meant to be a Twilight Zone-like cruel twist ("Finally, I have all the time in the world to read!" *smash!* "... *cries*"), but I'm not sure if that's we're to get out of it. I'd imagine that Harvey's inability to speak is small price to pay for the freedom of actually being in control of his own body and having the dark side of him vanquished from his own head. I mean, I think Harvey is smiling even with the tear rof his brain (or, say, undergo one-time brain surgery, *meaningful look*) and he'd at least be able to keep Two-Face at bay. Keep that in mind (hurr) for when we get to the end, because that will just raise further questions.

So okay, the bad half of Harvey's brain is numb and he's finally free, but he cannot actually speak. I'm assuming that this moment olling down his face. Or is he crying in silent suffering? If the significance of this moment weren't muddled enough, the art makes the narrative so much harder to discern.

A story with a speechless, temporarily-sane Harvey Dent... that deserves an artist who can convey volumes through facial expression and body language. Tan Eng Huat's forte, however, seems more to be in gritty atmosphere and kinetic action, most of which I'm not including in this review anyway. It also doesn't help that the scarred and unscarred si mean, I think Harvey is smiling even with the tear rof his brain (or, say, undergo one-time brain surgery, *meaningful look*) and he'd at least be able to keep Two-Face at bay. Keep that in mind (hurr) for when we get to the end, because that will just raise further questions.

So okay, the des of Harvey's face just look like the same face, only with one side looking slightly demonic, right down to a pointy, almost goblin-like ear. We see that in the next page, after Harvey helps Batman save the kids from the fire (!), and they all head outside.

But before they do, Batman leaves Harvey alone with the kids (also "!", but for different reasons), the doctor quickly makes a confession to Batman about the surgery. And it's something that he needs to tell Harvey while he's e significance of this moment weren't muddled enough, the art makes the narrative so much harder to discern.

A story with a speechless, temporarily-sane Harvey Dent... that deserves an artist who can convey volumes through facial expression and body language. Tan Eng Huat's forte, however, seems more to be istill in control, before the short-term anesthetic wears off. Well, this one-shot story is almost over, so we gotta speed things up! *clap clap!* But seriously, this is kind of important, seeing as how Harvey still has a gun and all.



God. Harvey has a window of complete freedom, and his main goal is to finally just kill himself. And of course, because Batman can't let him do it, he wallops Harvey, who falls back with a "NO!" As Batman slips thet completing the procedure, and that Harvey isn't separated after all. To this, Two-Face snarls, "Liar! Harvey's gone! He's buried in my skull!"

Wait, what? At this point, with four panels left to rush towards its conclusion and tie up all loose ends, the story awkwardly explains what's really been going on all along. It's ostensibly a twist, but I'm not sure how many Two-Face fans will be surprised.




Wait, that's the end? That's the big reveal, and poof, it's over?


Figured it was about time that I finally just got a screencap of this.


Man, where to start? Okay, first thing: when I read this, I thought it was plainly obvious that both the surgery and the suicide attempt were "all Harvey," yet the narrative (punctuated by Batman's crazy "GYUAHHH?!" reaction) seem to treat this as a big revelation. I think my selective use of scans, cropping, and description all helped streamline this story a bit, but I had to read the actual comic a couple times to figure it out. Even then, I'm still a bit confused as to what Batman thought was going to happen, what Harvey wanted to happen, and what actually did happen.

Was Harvey's main goal to isolate Two-Face from his own brain, or just to pull a Jekyll & Hyde and "kill" himself? Two-Face's own word for Harvey's goal was "escape," and the second attempt was going to be by self-inflicted gunshot wound. So was Harvey's goal here simply self-obliteration, one way or another, or was it liberation? And since it failed, does that mean Harvey is now a powerless observer inside Two-Face, kinda like the ending of Being John Malkovich? God, what a horrible prospect!

But maybe it's not that bad. Maybe this just means that Harvey's right back to where he started, and that nothing's changed even despite his best efforts. If that's the case, then he could still have the surgery, or at least undergo regular brain-numbing treatments to keep Two-Face at bay. Either the doctors at Arkham could prescribe that, or Bruce himself could pay for the procedure, but then again, I'm not sure what the legality of that would be if Two-Face resisted. Either way, I'm not sure what to make of this because the story itself is just kinda convoluted.

What I see here is a really great story hindered by a few possible factors. One I've already mentioned is the artwork, but your own mileage may vary on that count. One reviewer found that it really captured "the gritty and realistic tone of the tale, selling you on its seriousness," but I personally would have preferred a cleaner, more expressive art style with an emphasis on characters. I don't mean full-on Bruce Timm style, but maybe more like Chris Samnee, who can balance both character and atmosphere.

Another possible problem is the length. While I treasure any story that can tell a lot in a very limited space of time, I think this particular story--and Harvey's arc in particular, with all the psychology it entails--needed way more room to breathe. Much like that Spectre issue which also dealt with the problems of "separating" the Harveys, the ideas here simply cannot be explored in such a short period of time before going right back to the status quo.

Related to that, yet another possible problem could be that Jonathan Larsen--unless I'm mistaken--is new to writing comics, and thus hasn't yet gotten comfortable with telling a story through that medium. This certainly does read like a writer's early work, but I'd argue that it's still very promising for all that. The actual Batman segments which I didn't include showed that Larsen is plenty adept at writing a good Batman mystery, especially one that has a touch of the personal for Bruce. If Larsen is indeed still new to comics, then I hope he sticks with it, because I'd love to see how he grows as a writer. Hell, I'd love to see him take a longer crack at Two-Face down the line, since he already seems to treat Harvey with more empathy than most writers, even the ones who write the character in starring roles!

Ultimately, I think the highest praise I can give this issue is that--with a different style of art and a bit of cleaning up--it would have been a solid story that could have fit right in with the wonderful DCAU Batman comics. But then, maybe I'm just thinking that because the issue reads like it was partially inspired by the great B:TAS episode Second Chance (review forthcoming soon, I swear!). As it is, it's flawed and rushed, but also promising and encouraging. As a Two-Face fan who so rarely gets to see stories where the character gets the respect he deserves, I really love what this story set out to accomplish, and that ambition alone makes it more interesting to me than most other comics out there now.

This standalone digital issue is on sale right now for just 99¢, so it's definitely worth picking up and supporting. And if you're interesting in reading any more of the new LotDK, do let me know what you think!
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  • 33 comments
okay. it happened. it finally happened. comic book science i can't suspend disbelief for happened. I'm done. I give up.
if it had been a raygun, or radioactive substances from mars, or even a doctor with supervillain hair, i'd have bought the whole thing, but no! Fuck your attempts at being "realistic" comics. I fart on you.

surrealname

5 years ago

surrealname

5 years ago

about_faces

5 years ago

surrealname

5 years ago

OK, after a couple of re-reads of those last few panels, I think - I think - I know what's going on.
Batman thought that Two-Face was trying to isolate Harvey and thereby control their shared body, with the Harvey personality as merely a helpless onlooker. But in fact, it was the Harvey personality who was trying to do the exact opposite - he was trying to isolate the Two-Face side of him, thereby rendering himself a strange version of sane - sort of like 'oh yes, I do have another personality, but he's been a bad boy and I've sent him to stand in the corner'. However, the operation didn't work, because, as Batman pointed out, the brain doesn't work that way, and a split personality is not literally split down the middle of the body - I'm not sure what it did do, but... not that. However, because Harvey was behind all this, and expecting to be free of his other personality forever, he sees the operation as having worked, but in the exact opposite way that he'd intended, and that once the anesthetic wore off, he would, as Batman suspected all along, be trapped as a helpless observer with Two-Face at the reins. Once Bats stopped him from ending it all and "freeing" himself that way, the deal, psychologically speaking, was sealed - Harvey retreated, and Two-Face took control, possibly (if you buy this version of things) forever, since as far as he was concerned, medical science had sealed away that nagging good side of his, and he'd never even have to think about it again - hence his little gloating session.
Or, y'know... not. Anyway, that's the best I can come up with on short notice.
As for the Two-Face design - yeah, I can't say I like it. That doesn't look like scarring, it looks like a whole new skin color, like he's half-caucasian and half, eh... purple-person. In any case, even if you do accept it as scarring, there's certainly no reason why it would extend all the way across his scalp from back to front and right down the back of his neck - it's Two-Face, not 'Bifurcated Head'.
That actually sounds like a pretty solid reading of this story. It's still pretty roundabout, and could probably have stood to have been expanded upon for several more pages, but that sounds about right. Sorry it took me so long to reply. I've been exhausted, and thus I just didn't yet have the mental capacity to really take in the twists and turns to read and respond to what you were saying until now.

... it's Two-Face, not 'Bifurcated Head'.

Totally. Similarly, it's also why I have a problem with artists who draw his ENTIRE side scarred. I blame B:TAS for popularizing that idea.

psychopathicus

5 years ago

I vote you keep the review as is. Sure, there may be a bunch of giant info-dump paragraphs that ramble on independently of the main narrative and end all too soon, but it perfectly evokes just what's so frustating about the source material: without those flaws, it could've been so much better. This is the kind of story you can't do using modern comic writing techniques (i.e. more emphasis on art and set pieces than narration and pacing), and the pseudo-science quackery would've been a bit easier to swallow if it came from one of the classic Two-Face stories of the Bronze Age. I see it as an early misstep by what still could turn out to be a great writer.

I was intrigued by the fatally-flawed-but-well-written first issue written by Damon Lindelof of Lost and Prometheus fame/infamy...

This is just so stupid I can't be angry at it.
Sure, there may be a bunch of giant info-dump paragraphs that ramble on independently of the main narrative and end all too soon, but it perfectly evokes just what's so frustating about the source material...

Heh, I think that may have been less LJ's fault and more just me being a long-winded bastard. :) Yeah, I really should have broken these walls of text up with gifs or something. Maybe I should... eh, no, no, it's already up and it'd take me at least a day to make it more readable. Ah well.

... and the pseudo-science quackery would've been a bit easier to swallow if it came from one of the classic Two-Face stories of the Bronze Age. I see it as an early misstep by what still could turn out to be a great writer.

Totally! I think a different art style--something a bit more colorful and "comic book like"--at the very least might have helped bring that across. Let's face it, we've all read dozens and dozens of comics with wayyyyy flimsier premises.

This is just so stupid I can't be angry at it.

The issue as a whole was actually quite well-written! It just was completely out of character for both Alfred and Bruce, who was written to sound way more like a douchier Tony Stark than Bruce Wayne. One moment in particular that bugged me was when Bruce found out that he'd been set up by a group of thugs hired to recreate his parents' murder (the fake Thomas, Martha, and Joe Chill, complete with an evil child/dwarf as little Bruce just reminded me of Mr. Burns' use of a fake Simpson family to fool Grandpa in Curse of the Flying Hellfish), and his mind reels over the possible suspects:



The whole time I read this, I was going, "Hugo. Hugo. It's Hugo Strange. Hugo could have. Hugo would have. Hugo virtually did! Damn it, Lindelof, at least acknowledge Hugo as the likeliest damn suspect before you get to your twist! HUGO, DAMMIT!"

mothy_van_cleer

5 years ago

1mercystreet

5 years ago

about_faces

5 years ago

psychopathicus

5 years ago

about_faces

5 years ago

psychopathicus

5 years ago

The part where Harvey cries gives me then feels. But I can't say I care that much for bald Two Face.
The baldness might come form him being about to have brain surgery, but I agree that hair is an integral part of all the best looks Harvey has ever had. I do agree with pretty much everything said about "Together" here, but I was a big fan of Lindelof's nu-LOTDK #1... Is it Alfred's actions that annoy people in that one?

about_faces

5 years ago

about_faces

5 years ago

It took me awhile to pin down exactly what I didn't like about this Two-Face. His bad side doesn't look any different than his good side in most panels, expression-wise. Then it hit me! He totally looks like the Green Goblin! Maybe it's just me, but I can't see that evil smiley face pointy ear/teeth without thinking of Good Ole Norman!

Also I hate the way Batman in drawn in this comic.
I was trying to see this artistically, but I totally agree. I hate when artists make the Harvey side equally hideous (just without the color). The fascinating thing to me about Two-Face (and Neal Adams really got this in the Batman all villain treasury cover as well as the Two-Face origin story in that great Batman annual) is the stark contrast between handsome and hideous.

Back during the Burton / Shumaker Batman movies I always thought that if you needed to cast a BIG name as Harvey, Tom Cruise would be the right guy....

about_faces

5 years ago

about_faces

5 years ago

Took me a couple of beats to realize what the switch was...and yes it was pretty obvious to me that Harvey wanted to cut off and imprison Two-Face all along (and not the other way around). Probably because, I can't imagine Two-Face ever quite being that smart about getting rid of Harvey (most of the time I think Two-Face is helping "wimp" Harvey get things done, he never seems to want to kill him, even though he does usually disparage his other half)

This does mean that it was Harvey that ordered the kids kidnapped and gave the order to kill them if the doctor didn't perform the operation (THAT would have been my big clue that it was Two-Face in charge of this and trying to cut Harvey off permanently). Btw...did I mention how much this comic reminded me of "Spock's Brain" (ST:TOS season 3 opener? - fun times!)

Anonymous

September 24 2012, 13:17:11 UTC 5 years ago

Hi all,

Newbie comics writer here. First just let me say thanks for taking the time to read and post so thoughtfully about my story. It's really gratifying to have you all give such thought to it, criticisms and all.

Because the review and the comments gave it such thought and had a number of valid questions about things I HOPED would be clear, I wanted to do what you're never supposed to do with a story, which is explain it. Well, explain some of it--some of it is meant to be ambiguous, after all.

It was, indeed, originally conceived as a considerably longer story. My bad for failing to cut it down better. Anyway, on to the factual questions:

First, I apologize for breaking anyone's suspension of disbelief...but the surgical procedure is real. I first read about it years and years ago as a philosophy major studying consciousness and the mind. My research for this story indicates that it's still done. So...sorry, but it's real! The surgeon, however, doesn't actually DO the procedure; as he tells Two-Face, he just closed the scissors to make Two-Face think the procedure was done.

The story doesn't actually say that Two-Face/Harvey's personalities reside on one side or the other. Batman, in fact, specifically says otherwise, when he says who you are isn't on one side or the other. Is he wrong? Or is it just Two-Face/Harvey who erroneously believes his two sides reside in their respective hemispheres and acts accordingly? On that, the story is silent. (I happen to believe the latter, but that's my interpretation).

Thanks for the kind words about my writing--I am indeed a newbie to the field. My first paid job was LOTDK #2, which you can find here: http://www.readdcentertainment.com/Legends-of-the-Dark-Knight-2012-2/digital-comic/DIG001487 (and tweet me @jtlarsen to let me know what you think if you buy it!)

I'd love to get another crack at these characters, but of course that's up to DC Comics! I can say, though, that I'm in the process of working out a deal to launch a webcomic of my own--so if anyone's interested, just holler and I'll keep a list of everyone who wants to know the details once it's out. (Don't believe the rumors that it's The Adventures of Bifurcated-Head).

Jonathan
Hello there, Mr. Larsen! My apologies for not responding sooner.

First just let me say thanks for taking the time to read and post so thoughtfully about my story.

You're very welcome, and thank you for your gracious response!

It was, indeed, originally conceived as a considerably longer story.

A damn shame it had it to be cut down. I would have loved to have seen the longer version. Would it have been two parts, or more?

First, I apologize for breaking anyone's suspension of disbelief...but the surgical procedure is real.

Yeah, I discovered that when working on this review! At one point up there, I linked to an article explaining what the procedure is, the side effects, and so on, but perhaps I should have been more explicit about the fact that it's a real thing.

For my part--and, I suspect, for some others too--the suspension of disbelief stems more from how the procedure would affect Harvey one way or another. It's a hard enough question to consider considering that Harvey's mental illness has been handled so differently by so many writers that he's impossible to nail down. As such, the only thing we really have to work from here--besides what we already know of the character throughout canon--is the details you've provided for your own specific take on Harvey here, and then we did our best to go from there to judge whether or not it seemed feasible. Which brings us to...

The story doesn't actually say that Two-Face/Harvey's personalities reside on one side or the other. Batman, in fact, specifically says otherwise, when he says who you are isn't on one side or the other.

That's where a bit of my confusion came in. Batman says that, yes, but then he immediately asks why Harvey would have aimed the gun with the hand that Harvey theoretically controls. I see what you're saying now, but reading it then, I wasn't quite sure where that idea came from, as I didn't see it addressed earlier on. Ultimately, I wasn't sure why Batman was saying what he said in the fourth-to-last panel there, so it tripped me up.

Or is it just Two-Face/Harvey who erroneously believes his two sides reside in their respective hemispheres and acts accordingly? On that, the story is silent.

Interestingly, this is the second recent Two-Face story to offer the possibility that Harvey himself is mistaken about the nature of his own mental illness, with the answers left up to the readers to decide. I'm intrigued by the idea that Harvey's own beliefs about himself could be challenged in such a way, and I'd love to see those ideas expanded upon just to see how he'd react.

My first paid job was LOTDK #2, which you can find here: http://www.readdcentertainment.com/Legends-of-the-Dark-Knight-2012-2/digital-comic/DIG001487 (and tweet me @jtlarsen to let me know what you think if you buy it!)

To heck with that notion! I'll tell you here and now! ;)

I just read it and loved it! It was a tightly told story that made the most of the two characters involved, and you wrapped it up in a way that said something meaningful about Batman's character, making the victory more important than just "the guy with no powers beat the guy with all the powers." And even then, you used that to say something about Batman's own strengths versus the abilities of most other superheroes, and how it can't be replicated. Very cool stuff. Also, J.G. Jones' art really served your story well, which only reaffirms my belief that the above story would have benefited more from a cleaner, more expressive style of art.

I can say, though, that I'm in the process of working out a deal to launch a webcomic of my own--so if anyone's interested, just holler and I'll keep a list of everyone who wants to know the details once it's out.

Holler, holler!
The last panel, with Two-Face grinning widely at Batman, with Harvey Dent's good eye looking hopelessly out, is one of the exceptions to the general way he's drawn in the rest of the comic. It's that sort of emotiveness that's missing from the rest of it, minus maybe that panel where he whispers, "He's coming."
And much thanks for dropping this Harvey fanblog, and writing such amazing thought provoking stories! Just wanted to also say how much I enjoyed All of the Above (art was fantastic as well, so I second the notion that the art may not have been the best suited to Together....

I loved the Batman Amazo throw down, and it reminded of the first Amazo story I read in the 70's, which was a follow up to the Libra story (that Morrison so heavily leaned on for Final Crisis) and had the League using Amazo to regather half of their powers which were lost to outer space, including half of Batman's vaunted detective intellect!

Even so it was Bat's who realized that (before the rest of the leaguers did) and after Amazo had tricked and trapped everyone else it took half a Bat to take him down! Fun stuff that lives between silver age silliness and 80's serious stuff.

The issue in question was Justice League of America #112 - Aug. 1974
http://www.jlasatellite.com/2008/03/justice-league-of-america-112-aug-1974.html
Thanks very much once again...I'll definitely come on back and post if/when I've got something to announce about my next project. Thanks again!

ext_1791118

May 7 2013, 13:39:32 UTC 4 years ago Edited:  May 7 2013, 13:41:20 UTC

Sorry if I'm double-posting, I accidentally did this anonymously and I don't think it went through. Anyway, I promised I'd let you know when my new project was out, and it is, so here I am! It's a free, weekly webcomic called "The Endling," and the first installment is up now, by me, an Italian artist I found named Cecilia Latella and my old Batman partner Paul Mounts on colors. It's been shepherded by comic-book deity Mark Waid and it'll be appearing on Thrillbent every Thursday. Please like The Endling on Facebook so you can let us know what you think and get notified when new installments go up. Thanks again!

- Jonathan
Hey, Jonathan! Hey, awesome, thanks for giving us the heads-up! I will be sure to make an announcement about it sometime this week! Thanks again for letting us know, and congrats on the gig! I look forward to reading it soon!

--John Hefner (about_faces)